It's National Cake Day! #NationalCakeDay #CakeDay Celebrate with one of these #BariatricSurgery friendly Microwave Protein Cakes. You can make one of these In 5 minutes from start to finish (like those microwave mug cakes) #Recipes: https://tinyurl.com/35vop7b #WLS #WLSeats #WLSfood #lowcarb #sugarfree #protein #WLSCommunity #WLSSupport #GastricBypass #RNY #VerticalSleeve #VSG #weightloss #weightlosssurgery #weightlossjourney #fitness #Eggface

Erika Nicole Kendall’s ongoing weight loss journey is beautifully chronicled on her blog, Black Girls Guide To Weight Loss, or BGG2WL, for short. Her weight loss transformation began unexpectedly after signing up for a gym membership from some persuading from her mother. But after losing over 170 pounds, Kendall became a Certified Personal Trainer and Nutrition Specialist and writes about food, fitness, body image, and beauty on her blog.


“You can’t just say, ‘I want to lose weight…someday.’ It’s that kind of loose talk, without a fence or guideline, that discourages you from getting started and prevents you from succeeding. The way I did it was by tying it to an upcoming event in my life. I never focused on a number and I didn’t set out to lose a certain number of pounds per week or overall. I merely found a target date a year away and I proclaimed to myself that I’d be in better shape by then. — Maria Menounos, author of  The Everygirl’s Guide to Diet and Fitness, on how she lost 40 pounds
Over 3 years ago, Lori decided she had had enough and that it was time to change her life. Lori opted to get fit the right way, by eating right, exercising and blogging to keep herself accountable. Today, with over 105 pounds down, Lori’s not just your run-of-the-mill fitness enthusiast. She’s competed in a triathlon, shares fun photos and daily happenings, and incorporates whole foods, lots of fruits and veggies, less sugar and the occasional Reeses Peanut Butter Cup into her diet (hey, everybody’s got a weakness, right?).
Although I am not tiny or super duper in shape, I feel that I am finally at a comfortable and healthy weight that I can maintain while being busy and always on the go. My routine over the last year has been to try and eat fairly healthy during the week and then cheat a little on the weekends. If I splurge at one meal, I try and drink a healthy shake or a plate of veggies at the next to “make up for” the last meal. As I said before this is NOT health advice, just how I maintain my weight without counting every calorie. I am  not one of those people with a crazy metabolism who can eat whatever they want so I have to be conscious about it all the time. Boo to any of you who are that way. I am forever jealous. One thing that has really helped me to start losing some again recently has been an alkaline diet. I honestly FEEL so much better too!
Well, I should begin on the child hood years.  As a child I was not over weight.  I was pretty active as a child, my weight didn’t go up till I hit puberty.  I guess all that candy and soda caught up with me.  However when I hit about 15, the weight came back off, I was a cheerleader in the fall, and I played softball in the spring,and did a lot of other activities in between.  Then when I hit 18 I really started to work out.  I kind of got obsessed, I was working out to Carol Alt’s VCR tapes (remember VHS tapes?) and I got into the best shape ever.  I am 5’11 and made it to 135 lbs, not too shabby.  However, I didn’t eat that much and felt horribly guilty when I did eat.  Not good!  Honestly I don’t know what happened after that, to why I stopped working out that is.  I guess that’s when I hit age 20.  The discovery of pizza, beer, bars, guys and friends.
If HIIT workouts and strength training aren’t part of your exercise routine, it’s time to add them in. Instead of just running or walking on the treadmill do bursts of high intensity running or sprinting followed by a cool down. For example, you can sprint full force for 30 seconds, slow down and walk for two minutes, then rev it up and sprint again for 30 seconds. Continue this routine for 10 to 20 minutes. If your gym offers Tabata workouts, check those out, too.
Don't get me wrong — exercising at any time is good for you. But evening activity may be particularly beneficial because many people's metabolism slows down toward the end of the day. Thirty minutes of aerobic activity before dinner increases your metabolic rate and may keep it elevated for another two or three hours, even after you've stopped moving. What that means for you: You're less likely to go back for seconds or thirds. Plus, it'll help you relax post meal so you won't be tempted by stress-induced grazing that can rack up calories, quickly.

Like I said earlier, I want to share my experiences because I feel it’s important to give back. Plus, as a true blue blogger I feel I can offer a different type of wisdom and perspective than someone who has only blogged for a couple years and only talks about blogging. I’ll provide a snapshot below of my blog income streams but please head over to Big Boss Moves for a much more in-depth look into my personal blogging experience.
About: Nicole’s just a regular ‘ole girl that occasionally likes to try new fitness and, as she puts it, only gets up to work out at 5 a.m. if she’s under duress. And it’s that attitude that makes her so gosh darn appealing. She’s not the in-your-face runner, the strict “paleo-diet-only” recipe blogger. She’s just an average girl doing average things — much like the rest of us. Plus, she’s pretty darn funny and not afraid to use self-deprecating humor. Love it.
This double-blind clinical trial study was conducted on 42 obese and overweight individuals (25 < BMI < 35). Participants were selected from those, who referred to a nutrition clinic (Ahvaz, Iran). Participants were screened based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Inclusion criteria were lack of physical activity, no smoking, no alcohol drinking, no usage of herbal supplements and vitamins, and lack of weight changes in the last 6 months. Exclusion criteria included pregnancy, breastfeeding, use of drugs that effect metabolism, lipid and glycemic profile, eating disorder, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, kidney problems, thyroid, digestive, respiratory diseases, and cancer. Participants consuming more than 300 mg of caffeine daily (described as caffeine users) were excluded from the study (20). The level of physical activity was assessed weekly by phone. The subjects, who had moderate or various physical activities, were excluded from the study.
What are you doing this weekend? I hope you’re signing up for MEND our new virtual 6 week workshop with the wonderful @rosiemolinary We launched a BONUS #bodykindness #podcast today and we have a coupon code for listeners. Enter SpiralUp at registration and you’ll save $130— all 6 weeks for $299 included our live session and Facebook group. Head on over to the podcast for Rosie and Rebecca insight. Then sign up for MEND with us... the only thing broken is how you see yourself. Starts 3/14
The above diet does work. In fact we’re coming out with an eBook in a few days that will layout exactly what to eat for a 2-week time period, including complete grocery shopping list and daily meals. The thing about this particular diet is that you need to be pretty strict with managing blood sugar levels in order to see the type of results in the 4-5 pounds per week range.
Let me start by saying, HOW INSPIRING!! I am 54 years old, turning 55 in February. I just started your Instant Pot Class. I lost 100 pounds a couple years ago, but then I got hospitalized with pneumonia and pleurisy. The strong steroids sent my sugar through the roof and damaged my pancreas, so now I have diabetes. All the new medications I’m on caused me to gain back almost 50 pounds. I have rods from my neck to my tailbone and I now have fibromyalgia and neuropathy, which makes a lot of exercises, including walking for long periods or distances, quite painful. I have found Chair Zumba classes on You Tube, which I do M, W, F, and strength exercises that I do T, R, Sa. I rest on Sundays. I too, wear my Vivofit, and find it to be an inspiration.
I am not one to read blogs, but I stumbled upon yours and just read your entire story (and many of your other posts). I am nearly in tears at how inspiring you are! You have such an amazing outlook at the entire weight loss journey. I have struggled my entire life with my weight and I am so glad that you gave me a different way to look at it. It isn’t about a true end goal, but a complete lifestyle change. So from the bottom of my heart, I want to say thank you! You have impacted me and my mindset in a positive way! I pray that your fitness lifestyle continues to inspire those that cross paths with you!
Hi – well after one week I can say I lost 1 kilo – great! … BUT put it back on! Ha! With visitors in town and the spine of a lettuce that’s what can happen. Hey ho and here we go again. Cianna – your achievement is wonderful. If you can keep doing what you’re doing you’re more than likely to adopt a new lifestyle and keep your pounds off. It is wise to adopt a change in lifestyle that can be sustained. Not sure how long Adam would advocate eating black beans!
Fast forward several years later, I had another baby (Winter) and came out of that pregnancy about 40-50 lbs over my end goal weight. I had always had this dream to finally hit the big “100” in weight loss. By 2013 I had begun to take some classes at the gym and count calories a little more but I in NO WAY did anything extreme. And I honestly believe that is the key to weight loss and to keeping it off. It was NO quick journey to that final number but by July 2013, I hit 120 lbs and had officially lost 100 lbs…

About Blog After years of yoyo dieting, Julie Obiamiwe decided in 2014 to lose the weight for good and maintain a stable weight from then on out. By 2015 with her shape beginning to change but progress a bit slow on the scales, she decided to set up a weight loss journal to make herself accountable and in June 2016. The YoYo Chronicles came into existence. Follow her journey as she faces down various challenges including a sedentary job as a legal aid solicitor, peri-menopause, menopause to name a few.


Authors’ Contribution:Study concept and design: Damoon Ashtary-Larky; field, experimental, and clinical work, and data collection: Damoon Ashtary-Larky, Nasrin Lamuchi-Deli, Mehdi Boustaninejad, Seyedeh Arefeh Payami, and Sara Alavi-Rad; data analysis and interpretation: Matin Ghanavati and Amir Abbasnezhad; preparation of the draft, revisions or providing critique: Meysam Alipour; overall and/or sectional scientific management: Reza Afrisham.
Wow! I truly believe that I read this post today for a reason! I have been taking anxiety medication for the past 5 years and have gained almost 70 lbs in these 5 years. I’ve literally gone to doctor after doctor about my weight gain and no one could determine why I’ve gained so much weight. I’ve literally gone back and forth about quitting cold turkey and was so fearful about the withdrawl side effects. I feel like my weight gain is causing more anxiety than why I’m on the medicine to begin with. I can’t thank you enough for sharing your story and motivating me. Thank you!!
"When you're stressed out or tired, it's very easy to forget when your hand goes into the cookie jar," says Marisa Sherry, RD, a registered dietitian in private practice in New York City. "Are you being honest with yourself about taking just one handful here and there? When you have a cup, are you really having one cup? Most drinking glasses hold about three cups. By the end of the day, it all adds up." 

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch).
What to eat to lose weight is a sticky subject because there are so many diets on the market right now. You must use a diet that helps you eat the best food, and you need a diet that is tailored to your body. Someone who plans to lose weight must have a diet that fits into their exercise routine, and they must be willing to eat things that they might not have eaten before.
“It’s no big surprise, but my go-to weight loss tip is to eat more vegetables. They are the most low-calorie food you can consume, and they’re filled with health-boosting, satiating nutrients. From smoothies and eggs to soups, main and side dishes, they can fit in anywhere and boost volume and nutrition. If you want to eat more while still losing weight, veggies are your answer. —Laura Burak, RD, CDN
I know you’ve heard this all before, I’m sure, but seriously my friend THANK YOU for this post it was amazing and made me feel Like 1. I’m not alone in this world of stress and eating and anxiety and 2. It’s a journey and I can do it !! Thank you! Ps I would love to know some of your tips and tricks in how you manage stress and anxiety, maybe another post
What’s one poor decision that David sees people over the age of 50 making all the time? Skipping meals, most likely because of a decreased metabolism. “As we age, our hormones change,” she says. “Estrogen and testosterone gradually decrease over time, which leads to fat accumulation due to the body not processing sugar, as well. We also lose more muscle mass as we age, causing our resting metabolic rate to decrease. However, skipping meals can cause you to be deficient in important key nutrients needed as we age, such as overall calories and protein. Eating regularly throughout the day and getting enough calories/protein will help with higher energy levels and maintain muscle mass, which means a higher metabolism.”
About: On March 1, 2014, a visit to the doctor’s office really brought things home for Bobby. At 6 feet tall, Bobby weighed in at 345 pounds. To be at a healthy weight, his doctor said he needed to weigh 177 pounds, 168 pounds less than the weight he was at. In essence, Bobby realized he was essentially carrying around another person. The moment was the catalyst he needed to change. Rather than set any unrealistic expectations, Bobby decided to set the small, attainable goal of losing 2 pounds a week. So began his blog. And, guess what? It worked. Two years later, Bobby weighs in at 214 pounds (he looks great, by the way), and continues to take those small baby steps that are helping him achieve a healthy body. Bravo.
I’m not a big milk chocolate fan, and I do love dark chocolate the best. I made different kind of chocolates and things for my family. My family and I eat so different, that I try to incorporates everyone’s taste buds. 🙂 Your right, moderation of anything and you can still lose weight. That took me a long time to learn that. It’s nice to know you can eat more than carrots and celery! Thank you so much Susan for the kind words!
Articles and information on this website may only be copied, reprinted, or redistributed with written permission (but please ask, we like to give written permission!) The purpose of this Blog is to encourage the free exchange of ideas. The entire contents of this website is based upon the opinions of Dave Asprey, unless otherwise noted. Individual articles are based upon the opinions of the respective authors, who may retain copyright as marked. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the personal research and experience of Dave Asprey and the community. We will attempt to keep all objectionable messages off this site; however, it is impossible to review all messages immediately. All messages expressed on The Bulletproof Forum or the Blog, including comments posted to Blog entries, represent the views of the author exclusively and we are not responsible for the content of any message.
I’m finding the same thing right now for my marathon training. I’ve been trying to hybrid a marathon training / weight loss program – but they don’t necessarily overlap. Don’t get me wrong – running a lot and eating well is bound to shed off some weight, but I’ll eventually move my diet and workout to align with my marathon goal over my weight loss efforts.
Klein, S., Burke, L.E., Bray, G.A., Blair, S., Allison, D.B., Pi-Sunyer, X., et al. (2004). Clinical Implications of Obesity With Specific Focus on Cardiovascular Disease: A Statement for Professionals From the American Heart Association Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism: Endorsed by the American College of Cardiology Foundation. Circulation; 110(18): 2952-2967.
×