About: It may be tough to tell by looking at her photo (complete with a very toned tummy), but Hannah’s no stranger to gaining weight. She packed on about 50 pounds each time she became pregnant with her two kids until she eventually went from a size 4 to a size 12-14. The pregnancies also changed her body and made her unhappy with the way she looked. Ready for change, Hannah created a fitness and food plan for herself, stuck to it and noticed she slowly but surely lost weight and started to look more and more toned. Now she’s studying to be a personal trainer, and her blog is a place she shares all her fitness tips, nutrition ideas and motivation to help others lose weight too.
Hi. I weigh 220 and am 5’8’’. I’m obviously overweight but I’m not in terrible shape, I play sports twice a week and try to run one or two times a week also. I have a 5K coming up in 2 weeks and I plan to do an event on June 1 where I need to be 210 pounds. I don’t want to stop at 210, I want to be back under 200 again. I don’t think I eat terrible, I eat granola in the morning and lunch during the week and try not to go nuts at nighttime. My vice is beer on the weekends, I am not an alcoholic but I can easily put back a six-pack if I wanted to on a Friday or Saturday night when hanging out with friends. Other than the beer, I only drink water, green tea, and coffee – no sodas or sugary drinks.
On this site you will find a huge database of the nutritional values of just about any food you can think of. It also has a database of the calories burned in exercises as well as normal daily activities. There are tools to help you figure out your caloric needs for a day (these are generalized so they will be a good starting point for you. Mine are very different than the standard but I started with these numbers and adjusted up or down as needed to achieve weight loss at the speed I felt was healthy)
About: Yes, it’s true Julie is not exactly a “new” blogger (she’s been doing it since 2011). But when you look at her blog, it’s easy to see why we added her here — she’s got the same caliber as the big guns, and deserves even more recognition than she’s already had. Julie decided some time back that she was going to make better decisions when it came to her health, but progress with weight loss, as she puts it, has been “S-L-O-W.” Determined and just happier with the way she feels, Julie carried on until she reached her goal weight. Today, she hovers between 150 and 170 pounds, blogging about what she eats, what inspires her and how she hopes to inspire others, too.

About: Sara’s blog is a healthy blend of family and her faith in God, combined with valuable insight on how to find health and happiness and reduce stress. And trust us, she’s someone that knows. About a decade ago, Sara was 100 pounds overweight and miserable. She started journaling and found an affinity for running and competing (even though she’s not particularly athletic). Today, Sara shares her passion for helping other women find balance and tips on losing weight the same way she did.
About: Simon and Becky are lifelong health enthusiasts. They care about making wholesome choices, and they care even more about helping you do the same. Rather than get super personal, Simon and Becky’s blog is dedicated to bringing readers the latest news, information, tips and advice for achieving a healthy lifestyle. You’ll find all the info you need, from diets, to celebrity tips, to beauty, to fitness and more.

Hello – I found this site this morning as I too am looking to shed a few kilos – 7 in fact – that I feel are making me uncomfortable as my clothes are too tight. I don’t want to buy a bigger size so am opting to lose weight instead. These kilos have piled on due to a change in lifestyle which finds me working from home and not having to go to a work place. I have develop bad habits and reduced the amount of time I stand or walk about a building.

My experience with intermittent fasting finds that’s it’s best to start with a 16 hour fast (i.e. 8PM one evening to 12PM the next day) for the first 1-2 weeks. Once you are comfortable with this schedule, you can increase the amount of time you spend fasting. Do this by adding 30 minutes to each fast until you get to where you are fasting for 20 hours at a time.
Focused strength workouts 1-2 times a week- First, focus on building muscle with straightforward strength workouts.  This can be a total body workout twice a week or split routines for upper and lower body.  And 'straightforward' workouts doesn't mean you have to do boring exercises.  There are great kettlebell exercises that can increase your strength just as well as regular dumbbells and don't forget you can also use resistance bands as well.  Just make sure you're lifting enough weight.
“To lose weight you should primarily eat whole foods, but don’t eliminate your favorites. Consistently eating nutrient-dense food on a day-to-day basis will improve the chances of upregulating metabolism and of eliminating nutritional deficiencies. That may mean tracking what you eat in some way at first, but it doesn’t mean ruling out entire food groups or foods you love. Consistent quality nutrition while learning to enjoy treats in moderation will set you up for long-term sustainable success. — Victoria Viola, PN Certified Nutrition Coach, NSCA CPT, Co-Founder, Excelerate Wellness, LLC
Gabel, K., Hoddy, K. K., Haggerty, N., Song, J., Kroeger, C. M., Trepanowski, J. F., … Varady, K. A. (2018, June 15). Effects of 8-hour time restricted feeding on body weight and metabolic disease risk factors in obese adults: A pilot study. Nutrition and Healthy Aging, 4(4), 345–353. Retrieved from https://content.iospress.com/articles/nutrition-and-healthy-aging/nha170036
I also started doing home exercise programs and found them to be highly effective. No more money and hours wasted at the gym. But now for maintenance, I only do high-intensity interval exercises with basic equipment (dumbbells, kettlebells, bodyweight) at home. Only 20-30 minutes for 3-4 days a week will keep your metabolism high and continue to burn fat throughout the day.
Women usually need fewer calories than men, especially as they age. That's because women naturally have less muscle, more body fat, and are usually smaller than men. On average, adult women need between 1,600 and 2,400 calories a day. As you age, you need to take in fewer calories to maintain the same weight. You can also keep your weight healthy by increasing how much physical activity you get.
×