Hey Adam, I am 16 years old and weigh 156lbs, since April of 2013, I’ve been on a strict vegetarian diet. This dramatic switch in diet lead me to lose 50lbs over the next 6 months and I feel great. I’ve followed many dieting rules that include cheat day and exersising but, I have hit a wall, everything I do (switching starchy grains for high fiber veggies, more water consumption, etc.) isn’t providing the results that I want. Instead, my weight fluctuates between 156lbs and 159lbs and my goal is to be about 150. I need some advice on how to lose the last 10-ish pounds. Can you help me?
Jen just signed up for her first triathlon. That’s 3 miles of running, 10 miles of biking and 1/2 mile of swimming. All at once. Not bad for a woman who started out 50 pounds heavier. When you visit her blog, be sure to check our her “My Story” tab. Her essay explaining how she and running became “BFF’s” (despite the fact that she started out 50 pounds heavier and went through more hardship in a few years time than most people endure in 10) will have you laughing out loud and also deeply move you. She’s on a journey to fit and she’s taking everyone with her.
Potassium, magnesium, and calcium can help to serve as a counter-balance for sodium. Foods that are rich in potassium include leafy greens, most "orange" foods (oranges, sweet potatoes, carrots, melon) bananas, tomatoes, and cruciferous veggies — especially cauliflower. Low-fat dairy, plus nuts, and seeds can also help give you a bloat-busting boost. They've also been linked to a whole host of additional health benefits, such as lowering blood pressure, controlling blood sugar, and reducing risk of chronic disease overall.
About: Jenny always knew that she wanted to be a motivational speaker one day — she just wasn’t sure about what. Then one day it hit her, people are the most inspired by people who understand what they’re going through. For Jenny, that had always been her compulsive overeating, body image and food addictions. Four years ago, she decided to change. She transformed her way of thinking and her blog was born, complete with recipes, tips and posts that are truly inspirational from a woman that gets what you’re going through.
About: Brian’s struggles with weight are some we can all relate to — the need to get healthy, fit, you name it. But what makes his blog particularly interesting is that his studio apartment doesn’t have a kitchen. That forces Brian to get creative, and all he has to work with is a mini-refrigerator and a Big Boss Rapid Oven. His blog is a way to stay accountable and share recipes that are about as creative as you can get.
Since June of 2012, John Smith (and we call him John Smith not because that’s his real name, but because he never gives it) has been keeping an online food diary, complete with daily meals, calorie counts and even a “Yummy to My Tummy” rating - a 1-10 rating John assigns for food taste and quality. In his captivating manner of writing, John explains that he started his blog to take himself out of a deep depression that being 700 pounds had caused him. John is a self-confessed recluse who doesn’t work and doesn’t get out much. A shame, because if John’s manner of writing is any indication of his personality, then he is definitely a person worth knowing. Check his blog out for some insight into what a picture of a person trying to escape morbid obesity looks like.
So at age 20 my weight started to climb, but I didn’t notice or care because I was having fun.  At about age 24, I still didn’t workout at all and just partied and enjoyed my time with my friends.  I had an asthma attack, and went to the Doctors and that is when he told me, if I keep going this route I would die! (Thanks Dr. Becker) Pretty abrupt, but it’s true.  I was hitting near 200lbs and heading down the road of disaster.  I don’t think I ever made it to 200lbs, but I came pretty close.  (That’s me with the brown hair and bag in the picture, gross huh?)
Probably. If you have overweight or obesity, your risk for many health problems is higher than that of women who are at a normal weight. Even a small amount of weight loss can lower your risk for or even prevent health problems like diabetes and heart disease. Calculate your body mass index (BMI) to see whether you’re at a healthy weight. If you have overweight or obesity, start by making small changes to your eating habits and getting more physical activity.
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