One of the most fascinating things about reading Sean’s blog is his ability to draw you in with the fact that he knows he’s far from perfect - and that he will have many successes and failures through the years as he works to stay in shape and lose weight. It’s that mindset that helped Sean lose a staggering 200 pounds. Sean allows himself room to make mistakes, but connects with people by offering inspiration for the road blocks and not being afraid of sharing his failures along with the triumphs.
Andie is a healthy recipe developer and New York Times best-selling author. She shares some of her most delectable food ideas on her blog. She’ll tell you right up front: She believes in balancing health and happiness. And it was through that balance that she lost 135 pounds — a journey that can also be found in her memoir, “It Was Me All Along.” Visit the blog.
It sounds like you are in healthy weight range. I think that you probably look great. The thin obsession is not always the healthy way. If someone doesn’t think that you look good at 122 pounds, then they have the problem. If you don’t think that that weight is small enough, then perhaps you may need to consult a counselor. All I am saying it that weight is not overweight for hardly anyone unless they are 4 foot 8 or under.

“Drop four sizes in 30 days!” “Lose 10 pounds in 3 weeks!” We’ve all raised an eyebrow over some of the OTT promises made by fad workout programs and diets. But although many rapid weight-loss plans are said to be safe and backed by science, shocking your body in this way can actually be downright dangerous, says dietitian Bonnie Taub-Dix. “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is,” proclaims the creator of Better Than Dieting and author of Read It Before You Eat It: Taking You from Label to Table.
When Annabel started blogging 3 years ago, she did it to chronicle her weight loss. But as the pounds came off and her life started to change, so too did Annabel’s blog. Annabel’s journey became about much more than losing weight. For her, weight loss was not about melting pounds off and being thin. She realized that just because people were thin by no means meant they were happy. Rather than focusing on weight loss and obesity, Annabel decided to focus on health overall. She lost 150 pounds, and her method of inspiring others is truly unique: rather than encouraging them to focus on weight loss, she advocates for focusing on the health you gain.
About: It’s difficult enough trying to get yourself on track to living healthy, but add in a family, and it can seem like the odds of success are astronomical. Enter Katie. As the mother of six, she has a lot of experience and a laundry list of tips and tricks busy moms and families can work together to achieve wellness. She sticks to real food, natural remedies and natural living in an effort to combat all the chemicals and pollution that could potentially hurt your family — and she does a darn good job of it.
Stress may contribute to abdominal fat, according to several studies, including a recent one at the University of California, San Francisco. "When you're stressed, hormones like cortisol stimulate your appetite, slow your metabolism down and encourage fat storage inside your abdomen," explains Shawn Talbott, Ph.D., director of the Nutrition Clinic at the University of Utah. So what's a frazzled girl to do? "Find an activity that reduces stress for you, whether it's listening to soothing music or taking yoga, and do it daily," advises Talbott.
Invest in single-serving containers. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases says that a serving size on a food label may be more or less than the amount of food you should eat, depending on your age, height, sex, and weight. Once you're done cooking, place the excess servings in the containers to eat for lunch or dinner tomorrow. That way, you won't polish off everything in one sitting.
Speaking of intervals, high-intensity interval training (otherwise known as HIIT) has been shown to be incredibly effective for weight loss. Because the workouts are so intense, you don't need to put in an hour — or even 30 minutes — at the gym. According to the American College of Sports Medicine, seven minutes is all you need to get in the best shape of your life.
This question is on so many minds: how can I lose belly fat...and fast? While there's no magic formula of food and exercise to reduce belly fat with the snap of your fingers, there are nutrition choices, exercises and lifestyle changes that can help. Here's your guide to understanding exactly what belly fat is and how you might be able to reduce it over time.
A 2012 study also showed that people on a low-carb diet burned 300 more calories a day – while resting! According to one of the Harvard professors behind the study this advantage “would equal the number of calories typically burned in an hour of moderate-intensity physical activity”. Imagine that: an entire bonus hour of exercise every day, without actually exercising. A later, even larger and more carefully conducted study confirmed the effect, with different groups of people on low-carb diets burning an average of between 200 and almost 500 extra calories per day.
Vanessa is definitely someone to admire. Despite suffering from Long QT Syndrome, a heart condition involving an irregular heartbeat that can lead to fainting spells and even sudden death, Vanessa still puts quite a lot of effort into her health. Her condition makes exercise difficult, but that doesn’t stop her from sharing about all the things she does to change her life. She even has a “101 things in 1001 days,” list that chronicles her attempt to complete 101 self-bettering tasks (including many towards getting fit) in 1001 days.
Some of us no longer have the strong joints we had as teenagers. Jogging is out of the question and walking doesn’t cut it. The good news is elliptical trainers provide an intense, low impact cardio workout. In fact, a 145-lb. person can burn about 300 calories in 30 minutes on an elliptical trainer. That’s about as many calories as running burns, but without the joint wear-and-tear.
Thanks, I know the amount of food I was consuming was low working to increase (did I mention I’m Vegetarian) options are limited. Yes I am on the candida diet for a purpose, because of the access of yeast in my body, but I have been told it helps to lower weight. I wasn’t talking about weighting myself every day (saving that for every 2 weeks) I was just talking about a difference in my body. After I’m finished this candida diet I plan on continuing on a weight loss diet similar to what you are on, yet side I don’t eat meat I find it hard to get foods high in calories that are healthy, any suggestions. Thanks for your time.
So it’s no wonder that losing weight and getting in shape are among the most popular resolutions year over year, because so many people can’t keep them; 80% of New Year’s resolutions fail by February. So Moneyish spoke with several leaders in the field of obesity research and prevention who have reviewed the science surrounding weight gain and loss to explain what to eat and avoid; how much exercise you need and which workouts work best; as well as their tips for making these moves a part of your new, well-balanced life in the New Year.
About: One of the things you’ll notice first when you open up Lori’s blog is that she’s a very visual person — a style that reflects in her posts, which are chock full of photos sharing her fitness, food, travel and more. Lori started blogging about three years ago when she decided to lose 115 pounds. Now, she’s 105 pounds down and went from tipping the scales to doing a triathlon. Quite impressive, especially considering Lori has been overweight all her life. Follow her if you want to read about someone who’s the epitome of success, someone who continues to eat right, stay fit and maintain a huge weight loss. 

Middle-aged or not, there’s no reason why you can’t choose right now to change your life. Shelley did. With a dedication to revision, hard work and everything in between (yes, even the discouraging things), she lost over 100 pounds and has transformed herself from a person who may not have lived past 65, to a role model of active living for women. Shelley’s blog documents every success, every failure and, most of all, embodies what it means when an online community comes together to show support and give encouragement.

Have you ever decided to skip a meal to cut back on your daily calorie count? Despite saving a few calories in the moment, this strategy almost always backfires. When you skip breakfast, or any meal, you'll begin to experience excessive hunger that can lead to craving unhealthy foods—and lots of them. You may also eat faster than you normally do after skipping a meal, causing you to miss the warning signs that you're full and resulting in overeating.
Two years ago, Krista lost over 100 pounds by eating right and exercising regularly - embodying what nutritionists have been saying all along about combining the two to get the results you want. Now, her passion for writing and helping others get on-track comes through every single day in her blog as she dishes about food and recipes, fun races and 5Ks, her family and her life as a pharmacist.

In terms of exercise, I kept working hard. Exercising was one of my priorities and so I fit it into my schedule every day, usually on my lunch break. I exercised 6 days of week, and the bulk of my exercise was focused on running with the occasional lifting or circuit (my amazing sister, Lindsay, a certified personal trainer, created lifting plans for me). It was important to me at this point in my journey to have a cardio-based plan and running seemed the most practical. I started running over the summer (it was a SLOW journey of gradually increasing the time and speed on the treadmill every day) so by the time it came around to fall I could actually go run on the roads and continue to improve my endurance. (Note: I am planning on writing a whole post about my relationship with running because it has grown into such an important part of my life. Running used to be extremely hard and I hated it but stuck with it because I knew it would be good for me, but now I love it and the way it makes me feel). 


About: Their blog may be described as just “another” runner, but it’s anything but. The blog is chock full of tips, advice, nutrition information — and lots of personalized posts — from “mothers” who banded together to run, and realized just how much they loved it. The blog also works as a personal cheerleader, a way to connect with moms and women who started running (grumbling), tolerated it, started to like it (there are moments) and ultimately fell in love (addiction level).
Have you ever noticed that a couple hours after a big greasy (yet delicious) meal you feel hungry again? That’s because you have not turned off your hunger receptors, and as soon as your body starts to process that food your brain will start up again with “we need nourishment”… because you guessed it, that carton of kung-pow did not give you nourishment, just a full belly. Next time go for more veggies, you’ll stay fuller longer and thus eat fewer calories.
Jennifer Drummond is health food blogger for Peanut Butter & Peppers where she shares healthy, and sometimes not-so-healthy, recipes that help you maintain your weight loss by taking everyday foods and making them healthier without sacrificing the flavor. Jennifer has lost 30 pounds through proper nutrition education and shares her healthy lifestyle tips on her blog.
As my middle 30’s were here, I ate better, more home cooked meals, but again didn’t do any exercise.  I was tracking calories, but I wasn’t eating enough.  I didn’t know how many calories I needed in a day, I just thought I wasn’t suppose to eat.  At work the other day, I was cleaning my desk drawer out and came across papers that had my calorie intake for the day on it and it said I was eating 800, 900 and 1000 calories on a high day!  I was shocked, well no wonder I wasn’t losing any weight, I wasn’t eating enough.  You can’t go from eating way over 2000 calories a day to practically nothing.  But back then I didn’t care, I did that for a few months and gave up.  The scale didn’t move, so I figured again, this is the weight my body is comfortable with. (image of my calorie count from January 2009)
Over the summer I weighed in at 123 at 5’6, now I think I’ve gained about 10 or so pounds. I’m trying everything to get the weight off but I to give into my cravings when they appear, and my husband certainly doesn’t make it easy when I get home from work and he’s prepared dinner as he gets home before me (full of guy foods and carbs) We also have a 1yr old so between work and being a new mom I give in once in awhile especially if my son decides to share his sandwiches with me. I do pilates for about 30min 5days a week and love to walk because I found that helped to drop my baby weight last yr but it’s too cold for that now. What would you suggest?
I’ve learned a ton about health and fitness – specifically weight loss and motivation – over the past several months. So much so that I’ve recently become a personal trainer so that I could help others reach their health and fitness goals as well. I’m super excited about this new found passion and can’t wait to start helping more people. If you have any questions about this program or any other exercise program please don’t hesitate to ask – I’m here to help.
Always the chubby kid in school, Shelly’s weight struggles followed her well into adulthood. At age 35, she struggled with many obesity-related health issues, including high blood pressure and sleep apnea. After her father died of heart failure and sleep apnea and she heard about 9/11 victims who had to walk down 86 plus flights of stairs, Shelly decided it was time to make a change. She opted for weight loss surgery, started eating healthy and exercising daily. The result? A 158-pound weight loss. Shelly uses her blog as a platform to share her daily triumphs and struggles as she works to maintain her weight, share products she uses to stay healthy and eat right.

I wasn’t happy at my heaviest, but I wasn’t really motivated to do anything about it until a ski trip with friends in 2004 put things in perspective. The vacation was a blast, but I quickly lost my getaway glow when I saw photos from our trip. Looking at the physical proof, I was embarrassed by how much weight I had gained. Every photo was a “bad” photo of me. I was so depressed that I threw most of them away.

About: Normally, we’d skip right on over a blog that doesn’t identify the author’s name, but the woman authoring “Frantic at Forty” gave us pause. Why? Because her story is one that so many can relate to — a woman about to enter midlife trying to make sense of things and lose weight. The author started the blog just before she turned 40 as a way to stay accountable while she started out to give herself the only gift she wanted — thin. She’s lost plenty of weight, and, even more importantly, found some happiness in the process. We just hope that turning 40 doesn’t mean an end to her blogging.


I would love to hear more about how the recovery from the abdominoplasty was and how you a manged to do it with the girls being so little. My son is 5 and daughter 2 and I need to have a hernia repair, muscle repair with the abdominoplasty. And I just have no clue when to do it. My daughter still likes to be held often so I’m debating on waiting until she’s 3/4 but I’m so ready to have my body back. Thank you again for sharing your story and being open to answer questions!


About: Rachael’s got a unique combination of expertise. She’s an avid fitness lover, a health fanatic and a registered nurse. She also has to combat strange work hours to keep up her active lifestyle and exercise regimen, which is exactly why we picked her. When you’re among those who are trying to lose weight but have a hectic schedule, Rachael’s the blogger to turn to for advice. She knows how to fight obstacles like sleep deprivation, food cravings, boredom hunger and (of course) being “too busy” to get healthy.
When you want something sweet, all those fat-free, sugar-free options seem like a smart choice for weight loss. But researchers at Cornell University found that overweight people who choose low-fat versions of snack foods rather than the regular kinds consume, on average, twice as many calories. "The terms 'fat-free' or 'sugar-free' can create a green light effect, triggering people to eat more," says dietitian Cynthia Sass, RD. But many fat-free foods have about the same number of calories (or more) as their full-fat counterparts. 
“As we age, we are at higher risk for weight gain, due to our metabolism decreasing and hormones changing,” explains Kirsten David, a dietitian with EduPlated. “There are also many mental and social barriers over [the age of] 50 that can prevent us from losing weight, as well. Start making healthy changes now and form new healthy habits to prevent weight gain from happening.”
Even tiny changes in how and when you eat can add extra pounds or shut down the weight loss process. Did you start skipping breakfast or other meals? Did you try to lose weight by cutting out all sugar but now you’re bingeing on sweets ? Are you eating too many dairy foods to get extra calcium for bone health? If you’ve eliminated meals or changed your diet for what you thought were health reasons, your weight can go up.
It is not that men don’t diet. They just do it differently. They tend to include more saturated fat in their diet, while women tend to completely avoid them. Nutritionists explain, as long as they keep their intake lower than 15 per cent of their total daily fat intake, saturated fat isn’t harmful. In fact, small doses of saturated fat can help them avoid testosterone depletion.
It is possible to do more in less time — at least when it comes to your workouts. By incorporating interval training — that means bursts of high-intensity moves — you’ll give your metabolism a huge boost, says Glenn Gaesser, Ph.D., director of the Kinesiology Program at the University of Virginia and author of The Spark. If you usually jog at a consistent pace, try adding a 30-second to one-minute sprint every five minutes, or, if you’re on a treadmill, change up the incline for one-minute intervals.

About: Jenn’s story is one we can all relate to. She’s struggled with her weight all her life, and has spent many times going up and down with winning over her food addiction — and succumbing to it. Her posts represent the deepest emotions we battle when it comes to food, and it’s her willingness to open up that really touches readers. She’s been blogging for a long time, and her constant battle is one that more people definitely should follow.

I think we can all relate to this feeling, because, let’s face it—losing weight is hard AF. It takes a lot more than just a spurt of motivation and a trip to the produce section at the grocery store to really see lasting results. And thankfully for us, the internet has helped us all obtain the information we need to lose weight by the simple click of a button.
21. Keep it simple. "I take a minimalist approach to nutrition: My diet consists of lean protein (chicken breast, egg whites, ground turkey), complex carbs (quinoa, sweet potatoes, oatmeal), healthy fats (coconut oil, almonds, avocados), and leafy green veggies. I eat as clean as I can—locally-grown vegetables, organic when possible, and minimally-processed everything."
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