Gina Harney started The Fitnessista after she’d already lost 40 pounds. At the time, she was in maintenance mode in Georgia where, as she explains it, “healthy options were pretty scarce.” The blog was her way of chronicling how she sought out those healthy choices and often created them for herself. Today, Gina works as a certified personal trainer, group fitness instructor, and weight loss specialist. She loves sharing tips with her readers as they embark on their own journeys toward health. Visit the blog.

I know what you mean bout struggling through weight loss/gain. My Husband is super skinny and my step-daughter is thin too and they don’t understand the issues of weight. For me, weight can come on pretty quick. I will always be one of those people that has to watch there weight, I just can’t eat anything and not gain weight. It’s a struggle. I drive my family crazy sometimes, when we go out I say no, can’t eat that, thats to fattening, no thanks I don’t need fries, ect… and than I have my Husband who says your fine, enjoy it, eat it. Than I do than I feel horribly guilty. Sometimes we have to know to let go that we are not all perfect. The main reason I started my blog was for support. If I opened up and put it out there, than I feel accountable for my actions and I wanted people to know they aren’t alone. Thanks for leaving a comment, today I was actually feeling kind of bad, but you made me feel better. Take care of yourself and please feel free to stop by anytime. – Jennifer
I read about your weight loss and plan and its giving me hope to change. I recently am undergoing a lot of change internally and externally (adjusting to living alone , and a demanding new job) so I want a new me by the end of this month too – physically. I will try this new way of eating for 2 weeks, and keep a log of my progress and what I am eating along with the strength training. Question- I didnt see much in the way of cardio, did you do any in the first 2 weeks? thanks. Maria
Not in an extreme, Atkins sort of way, but having a little protein at every meal fires up your metabolism. "Your digestive system uses more energy to break it down, so you burn more calories," explains Lisa Dorfman, R.D. However, keep protein levels to between 20 and 35 percent of your diet; eating too much of it can cause kidney strain and may cause your body to store too much fat.
You’ll want to make sure that you’re getting enough protein, adds Dr. Keith Ayoob, an associate clinical professor at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He says most people after the age of 50 do typically eat a decent amount of protein, but not always early in the day when they most need it. The same is true for calcium and vitamin D, so he recommends loading up with a balanced breakfast each day and enjoying items like Greek yogurt and milk to make up the difference. Some research even indicates that a high-protein breakfast can directly impact weight management or weight loss, too.
Replace the negative voice in your head that's telling you to quit with a motivational saying that will inspire you to keep going even when it gets tough. "I powered through workouts telling myself, 'I can do hard things!'" says Megen Karlinsey, who kept off 150 pounds. Her mantra helped her accomplish a triathlon, which she signed up for to blast a weight loss plateau.
Karol K. teaches how to save on the popular Flex Belt, and discusses the basics of TRX training (learn more). He contributes articles on fitness training, working out, and losing weight in general. He also enjoys writing occasionally for WeightLossTriumph. He’s a fan of healthy living and being in shape no matter what. In his personal life, he proves that one doesn’t have to struggle to be healthy.
Nina has a flair for the dramatic. She doesn’t just like to monotonously go through what she ate or her weekly workouts, but rather writes with an edgy style that sets her apart from so many others. Another up-and-comer, she started her blog last November with an opening weight of just over 215 pounds. Now, she weighs in at 201. As a former athlete, Nina has never been a small woman. Growing up, she was often referred to as “Haus,” because of her uncanny strength and size for a woman - a nickname Nina sometimes struggled to accept. But Nina is quite unique and beautiful - and following along with her as she embraces that beauty, gets fit and accepts herself is something you won’t want to miss.

Such an inspirational story, Jennifer! The ones in the comments section too. I see that there are so many people are still struggling in dealing with weight management. So I have something for you guys. It’s red tea. Red tea reduces stress, aids in weight management because it burns fat passively, cleanses the body, and control cravings so you’ll get rid of the unnecessary calories. If you’re interested, I recommend this one: https://bit.ly/2I1DF0N 🙂
Women’s challenge with weight loss also comes down to nature. Nature wants to preserve a woman’s ability to bear children. When you’re in a calorie deficit, it can interfere with your fertility, so your body fights weight loss to prevent jeopardizing your reproductive capacity. So don’t cut more than 1,000 calories a day or eat fewer than 1,200 calories daily.
Andie is a healthy recipe developer and New York Times best-selling author. She shares some of her most delectable food ideas on her blog. She’ll tell you right up front: She believes in balancing health and happiness. And it was through that balance that she lost 135 pounds — a journey that can also be found in her memoir, “It Was Me All Along.” Visit the blog.
Scientists and nutrition experts like it too and are saying it’s the way of the future for losing and keeping weight off and new books and articles on the topic are being published daily including best selling books like ‘Eat Stop Eat’ and ‘The 8 Hour Diet’. Intermittent fasting is also popular with followers of the Paleo diet since our ancestors appear to have eaten this way for thousands of years.
You might say Vicki’s weight loss blog is an up-and-comer. She’s using it as a platform to launch herself into meeting her 60-pound weight loss goal, and here’s the thing: she’s doing a darn good job. Reading through her blog, it will become very clear that no matter the ups-and-downs, Vicki’s commitment to losing weight and changing her life is wholesome and candid. She shares her food choices, her exercise routines, her enthusiasm and even the occasional let-down. Her blog is perfect if you’re looking to follow along with someone from the beginning - someone who will very likely get there soon.
A year ago you couldn't find a fitter man than Drew of Fit2Fat2Fit, but then the personal trainer decided to take on a new project in order to better understand what his overweight clients were going through. He gained 70 pounds over six months—going from "fit to fat"—and is now in the process of going from "fat to fit." Along the way he's learned a lot about the mental struggles of weight loss, as well as the physical: check out his post about feeling too self-conscious to dance with his wife.
“I learned how to cook from scratch and experiment with flavors. The biggest change my husband Mark and I made was planning our meals for the week on Sundays. We also rely on food optimizing—using vegetables to bulk up our meals but still keep them low-calorie. It helped me lose 52 pounds and 8 dress sizes, while Mark lost 110 pounds.” —Amanda Gibbon, 46
I’ve been so inspired by you, and reading this I might FINALLY be able to nip my calorie counting obsession in the bud. I’ve been counting my calories for every meal since about April of this year, and i have become, like you explained, obsessed. And i know it’s a problem, and i shouldn’t focus on that, but everytime i eat i just think of how many calories it is, and what I’ll have left over for my next meals. Reading your story really inspired me and starting today i’m going to start trying to NOT COUNT. I deleted the counting app off of my phone, and im giving it a go!
Klein, S., Burke, L.E., Bray, G.A., Blair, S., Allison, D.B., Pi-Sunyer, X., et al. (2004). Clinical Implications of Obesity With Specific Focus on Cardiovascular Disease: A Statement for Professionals From the American Heart Association Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism: Endorsed by the American College of Cardiology Foundation. Circulation; 110(18): 2952-2967.
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