Monica Olivas is a holistic health coach, certified running coach, and writer for the blog Run Eat Repeat. She has been a passionate runner for almost 10 years and has completed over 50 half marathons and 30 full marathons. Running has helped her lose 20 pounds and uses her blog as a way to share healthy recipes, running tips, and motivation to help you do the same!
Sheryl’s story is a touching one. After spending 21 years in an abusive relationship and battling obesity her whole life, Sheryl decided it was time for a change. She started her blog back in April of 2012 at a weight of just over 300 pounds, and gave herself a deadline of 500 days to get her body (and emotions) to a place where she’s not only comfortable - but confident as well. A year later, she’s down almost 50 pounds - quite the feat when you consider that she suffers from many health issues - including chronic headaches and severe back and knee problems. Sheryl is still fighting every day to get where she wants to be, and she is sure to trust readers by putting herself out there in a completely honest and open fashion.

Are you like Old Faithful when it comes to your morning walk or evening jog? Know this: The more you do an activity, the more your body adapts to it, so you burn fewer calories. If you want to light a fire under your metabolism, consider cross-training. For example, if you normally walk, try biking instead. "Since you're not used to working all those different muscles, it's a more intense workout, which can translate into a greater metabolic after-burn because your body is working harder to recover and get oxygen to all your tissues," says Carol Espel, M.S., an exercise physiologist for Equinox Fitness Clubs in New York City.
Because men are larger than women on average and have more muscle to support, men can usually eat more calories while still losing weight, compared to women. Portion control may be especially important for women. In one study, women who ate smaller portions of food (and less food overall) had lower BMIs than women who limited or avoided a certain type of food.2 This approach seems to work better for women than men.3
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