“There are many foods that aid weight loss, but one that I often recommend to my clients and eat myself is grapefruit. Researchers at Scripps Clinic in San Diego found that when obese people ate half a grapefruit before each meal, they dropped an average of 3.5 pounds over 12 weeks. Apparently, the tangy fruit can lower insulin, a fat-storage hormone, and that can lead to weight loss. Plus, since it’s at least 90% water, it can fill you up so you eat less. However, if you are on certain medications you should not have grapefruit or grapefruit juice, so check the label on all your prescriptions, or ask your pharmacist or doctor.” — Patricia Bannan, MS, RDN, author of Eat Right When Time is Tight.
So what can we do with all this knowledge? Tempting as it is to get discouraged, we can actually find it encouraging. Biology is not destiny, after all. “Lifestyle choices are immensely powerful,” Peeke says. And on the heels of any tidal wave of new research is sure to come a trickle of weight-loss advice that can be more customized and more effective to help men and women with their weight-loss obstacles, no matter what they are.

About: Inspiring. That’s the first word that comes to mind when describing Gabby’s blog. Gabby used to tip the scales at 262 pounds and started a blog to chronicle her journey. Today, she weighs in at 140 pounds...in other words, half of her old self. But just because she dropped the pounds doesn’t mean she stopped being there for her readers. Thousands of articles and a whole lot of experience later, Gabby continues to share her weight loss wisdom and tons of healthy recipes with fans in an easy-to-follow — and often hilarious — way.
VLCDs are doctor-supervised diets lasting several weeks. The meals are nutritionally balanced, but expensive -- people can end up spending thousands of dollars over time. VLCDs safely produce a loss of 15% to 25% of body weight in 12 weeks. That's for those who finish the program: 25% to half of people don't complete the program. Weight returns when the diet is stopped and happens rapidly; some experts say its best to take a more sustainable approach to weight loss comparable to that of regular diets.
Not all weight loss is intentional. If you are not dieting but notice that you are losing weight, it may be a sign that you are ill. According to Katie Clark MPH, RD, a registered dietitian, anyone who loses over 10 percent of her body weight in a period of 6 months and who is not intentionally dieting should visit a physician. Unexplained weight loss can be the result of digestive issues, hyperthyroidism, type 2 diabetes or cancer.

If you’ve spent your entire life being the “fat person,” then you will find Andie’s story extremely touching and inspirational. After weighing in at a YMCA more than 6 years ago at 258 pounds, Andie decided her lifestyle needed a massive overhaul. She used her newfound drive to kickstart her life, one where she took a day-by-day approach to weight loss - and one that she used to lose over 135 pounds. Andie’s blog will have you licking your lips, as she shares delicious recipes and stunning photos.
However, if you’re already on medication and think it could be hampering weight loss efforts, speak with your doctor about your options. It may be possible to transition to a more natural option, like a natural form of birth control, coming up with a plan to transition off medication or simply trying an alternative that’s not known to cause weight gain.

Of course, you want to get to the bottom of why you’re not feeling so hot. One study found that practicing relaxation techniques helped obese women who were emotional eaters lose weight over the course of three months, along with helping them reduce depression and anxiety. (7) Engaging in other activities that can help you relax are a better option than emotional eating.
No significant changes were observed in systolic and diastolic blood pressure in any of these 2 diets, although a non-significant reduction in average blood pressure at the end of the study was observed in both groups. It seems that the effects of weight-loss diets on the decrease of blood pressure was more concrete in people with hypertension (27). Consistent with the current study, several studies did not support the impact of WL on blood pressure in people, who had normal blood pressure (16, 28).
When you pull up this blog and take a look at the photos of Mary, it’ll be hard to ever imagine her as someone who struggled with weight. A personal trainer, coach and figure competitor, Mary has quite an impressive resumé. But it wasn’t always that way. Over 6 years ago, Mary lost over 40 pounds, and has been on a journey to keep it off ever since. She ditched the unhealthy habits, started running and began blogging as a way to share her daily musings and thoughts with others. 
About: Ruzele’s had weight issues her whole life, but it wasn’t until after her mother passed away in 2011 that the pounds really started to pile on. She ballooned up to 335 pounds and had a rock-bottom moment that led her to where she is today: 50 pounds lighter and on a mission to lose 130 more. Ruzele’s blog posts are short and sweet, but always delightful and full of musings, emotions, progress reports and the occasional vlog (which work oh-so-perfectly). Ruzele’s one to follow if you’re looking for someone who’s accountable and gets to the point, but still leaves you rooting her on day-in and day-out.
This story was beyond relatable, it brought me to tears. I’m lying in bed as I write this. I had a miscarriage and had my D and C surgery this morning. I was on anxiety pills for a little over a year and when i found out I was pregnant with my third baby I decided to quit taking them. My OBGYN said the same thing yours did, but something inside of me urged me to quit taking them. I am at 180 pounds today. This is the heaviest i have ever been in my life. I’m turning a new page in my life. Although I have lost my baby, I’m so grateful to finally be off the antidepressants. This miscarriage was a wake up call for me. I look in the mirror and don’t even know who I am anymore. Your story has inspired me. I want to go back to being thinnish (I’m so stealing your so stealing your word “thinnish”!!). Thank you so much for sharing this.
Starving yourself is certainly not a good idea. But if you're otherwise healthy, a brief period of extreme calorie restriction isn't likely to hurt you. You should tell your doctor what you're doing, and be sure to include protein in your diet (70 to 100 grams per day). Take a multivitamin, and eat potassium-rich foods (tomatoes, oranges, and bananas).
I am 31 years old and have gained weight over last 10 years and currently i am 40lbs over my ideal weight (123lbs). I have been trying to lose weight but it creeps back up after one or two weeks. I have decided to go carb free finally as my brother just lost 20lbs in a month along with cross-fit boot camp. My question is that if i do one hour yoga instead of any cardio/walk/run/strength training, will it be fine or i need to include any thing else.
Also, my perspective of what a meal was evolved. I grew up thinking every meal needed to be a plate with a meat, veggies or fruit, carbs, grains, and dessert; and that just isn't accurate at all. I learned that it is totally acceptable to make meals like a bowl with veggies and protein. Or breakfast could include a big bowl of oatmeal with almond butter, greek yogurt, granola, and fruit. I incorporated a ton of fresh produce and didn't let myself buy junk food from the store. It's not always about eating less of everything either, it's less of some foods but more of others. 
If HIIT workouts and strength training aren’t part of your exercise routine, it’s time to add them in. Instead of just running or walking on the treadmill do bursts of high intensity running or sprinting followed by a cool down. For example, you can sprint full force for 30 seconds, slow down and walk for two minutes, then rev it up and sprint again for 30 seconds. Continue this routine for 10 to 20 minutes. If your gym offers Tabata workouts, check those out, too.
Hi I’m 22 an just moved to Canada from USA an have lots of immigration and legal things I’m paying for I married a Canadian woman that’s why I moved to Canada but I need help and we are on a right budget livin on one income us paying for Immigrations but within 6 months I can barely fit my jeans anymore and I got stretch marks which I never had in my life in cant afford a gym membership and I can’t work legally yet and still won’t be for a while I’m 6ft 3 Caucasion and pushin 250 lbs I feel drained and restless all the time and we live In a apartment so it’s hard to do anything with out neighbours complaining about noise even normal walking I was only 210 lbs when I moved here 6 months ago do you have any help ful advice
Stress skyrockets your levels of cortisol, often called “the belly fat” hormone because it signals to the body to store fat around your waist. Add the daily stressors of living our modern lifestyle and you can see how cortisol can be constantly coursing through your veins. This perma-stress mode isn’t good for a lot of healthy reasons, your tummy being just one of them, so it’s important to take time every day to de-stress. Yoga, meditation, walking, journaling, doing a hands-on hobby, or playing a musical instrument are all great time-tested methods. (Hint: Know what isn’t? Watching television. The boob tube actually increases your levels of cortisol!)
We just got a FREE treadmill though, and my goal is to walk at least 15 minutes a day (to start, I have a heart condition) and work my way up from there. And keep eating well. I don’t have a certain weight or size I want to get down to. That is just detrimental for me. I am changing my lifestyle. I want to get fit and healthy for the rest of my life and whatever size and weight that gets me to is just fine with me!
I believe that this cheat day is important for a number of reasons. Firstly, the science behind it suggests that if you go for too long on a limited-calorie diet (which this isn’t, however I noticed that it took me much, much less food to fill me up when I ate well, so you tend to naturally eat less on this diet) that your metabolism will shift to a lower gear in order to compromise for the lower intake of calories. By cheating one day and spiking the number of calories you consume, it will keep your metabolism from doing this – and allow you to maintain your high metabolic rate throughout the week.
About: Alycia’s been following blogs for years, but to her, the biggest problem is that many of them don’t start until after the author loses weight and finds success. Alycia’s got a different way of doing things — she is blogging to show her real-time approach for shedding her unwanted pounds, exercising and eating right. She’s putting it all out there and hoping that she can succeed, plus inspire a few people along the way.
About: Going through a divorce can do nasty things to a person — it can cause weight gain, low self-esteem, job changes, you name it. It certainly was a downward spiral for Emma, who went through the ringer before meeting (and getting engaged) to her current fiancé — but along the way she learned how to find the joy in life and learn to love herself. Emma decided to start a blog as a way to bring her newfound positivity to others. Her outlook on healthy living and eating, fitness and weight loss is charged with positivity. She’s a glass-half-full kind of person, and reading her blog can make you one too.
To prep his patients for success, Dr. Seltzer tells them to plan around a large evening meal by eating a lighter breakfast and lunch—NBD since most people who eat a meal before bed tend to wake up feeling relatively full, he says. Research suggests balanced bedtime meals may also promote steady next-day blood sugar levels, which also helps with appetite regulation.
One of the great things about Stefanie’s blog (other than it being extremely creative and fun to browse around), is that she not only lost 50 pounds since 2008, but has managed to keep it off - all by making complete 180 degree changes in her life. She used to hate running. Now, she is obsessed with it. She used to devour meat. Now, she is a vegetarian. She used to eat fattening foods. Now, she eats clean. After making the changes initially, something clicked for Stefanie, and she kept at it. Her mission now is to make healthy living attainable and realistic for anyone who stops by - a mission she works to complete through her writing every single day.

This question is on so many minds: how can I lose belly fat...and fast? While there's no magic formula of food and exercise to reduce belly fat with the snap of your fingers, there are nutrition choices, exercises and lifestyle changes that can help. Here's your guide to understanding exactly what belly fat is and how you might be able to reduce it over time.


This is a medical clinic providing weight loss surgeries. But their blog also has a lot of helpful information about losing weight and maintaining that weight loss without surgery. You can find posts about the types of conditions that contribute to weight gain, posts about personal weight loss journeys, and yes, tips and advice for those who might be considering surgery. Visit the blog.
The calorie restriction diet myth suggests you will win the fight against flab. While losing weight does come down to how many calories you consume, it’s the types of foods you eat that will determine how you feel as you lose weight and the kind of weight you will lose. If you have a poorquality diet — counting calories but eating junk food — chances are you’ll lose muscle rather than fat, and thus, suffer from slow metabolism.
When Haneefa set out to change her life, she weighed in at 232 pounds. But with her positive aura and bright style of writing, she didn’t let that number get to her. Since she began blogging about her journey in January 2010, she has lost a great deal of weight and is well on her way to her goal of 172. More importantly, Haneefa changed her life and become a committed runner, tearing up numerous 5Ks and half-marathons. She continues to lay it all out there with her witty, no-holds-back style of writing, making her blog a must-read for anyone looking for their own way towards weight loss.
Abby takes her voyage into healthy living on with a very realist attitude. She is extremely healthy, a runner who has competed in many races and went from barely being able to walk a mile to running anywhere from 6-12 miles a day. She also gives herself room to enjoy the less healthy aspects of life, such as cream cheese frosting, but doesn’t let herself get carried away. Her blog shares fun recipes, product reviews, race recaps and anything else related to her efforts to stay fit and have fun doing it.

Rise and shine—literally! Researchers from Northwestern University found that people who were exposed to bright daylight earlier in the day tended to weigh less than those who didn’t get sunlight until later. So right after you wake up, open the blinds and let the sunshine in. Or better yet, step outside and enjoy your morning cup of coffee on the front porch


In a way, moderate-intensity physical activity is that "magic pill" a lot of people are looking for, because the health benefits go beyond keeping your waistline trim: Not only can it reduce your risk of cancer, stroke, diabetes and heart attacks, but studies have shown that physical activity can significantly improve the moods of patients with major depressive disorders.
Top Quote: “If I surrender, give up the fight to do it all alone, then I’ll probably remain on the outskirts of that tribe of origin permanently. Is that a tough thing to write? You bet. But here’s the gorgeous thing about life – you can make your own tribe. You can form your own crew, you can find other lovable, crazy-about-life people that will be there to support you and lift you up.”

Over the past few months I’ve really learnt to control my junk food addiction and LARGE portions.. So cutting out junk food completely isn’t an issue for me and I’ve learnt to reduce my portion sizes quite vastly but I sometimes find it a little difficult. I absolutely LOVE RICE AND PASTA. However, I now only have pasta once a month if so. Also, I practically LIVE on rice and oatmeal.. Having oatmeal for breakfast 7 days a week and sometimes even for lunch. I have rice once a day or every other day.. Would brown rice grains be ok and would brown pasta be ok?
“The best thing you can do for your belly is to give up processed foods. A study in the journal Food & Nutrition Research found that our bodies burn only 50 percent as many calories digesting processed foods as they do real foods. So it’s like eating twice as much, even if the calories are the same!” — Mark Langowski, celebrity trainer and author of  Eat This, Not That! for Abs
You snack on fruit, count calories, and get some form of exercise most days. So when you step on that scale and the needle stays put, you wonder what the heck you're doing wrong. Even with clean eating and  good fitness habits, you may be making a few small mistakes that can lead to a plateau and derail your results. Here's how to upgrade your already-healthy habits to finally reach your get-slim goal. (Snack AND lose weight with this box of Prevention-approved treats from Bestowed.)
Anaerobic exercise, on the other hand, primarily uses sugar as its fuel. This doesn’t mean that it’s not good for weight loss, though. Anaerobic exercise helps build muscle, and as we explained above, this will help you burn calories even when you’re resting. Anaerobic exercises are generally high intensity, for example sprinting and weight lifting. 
If all you have is two weeks to lose weight, you’re going to have to be very strict with this rule. Luckily you can still drink any water-based drink such as coffee and tea, so it’s not all bad. I usually have a huge glass of ice cold water plus one or two large cups of coffee in the morning to kick start my day. I often use cinnamon to flavour my coffee – it’s a great tip for those of you that really enjoyed adding milk.
Recently I have started walk and a little control in diet. Honestly speaking I dont eat much but i love milk shakes and junk food and lots of teas and coffees and might be this diet increased my weight. Now I have to reduce it but I am unable to do it. 10 days according to you seems quiet impossible to me because I have been taking alot of care since one month but there is no change in weight at all.
About: Rachael’s got a unique combination of expertise. She’s an avid fitness lover, a health fanatic and a registered nurse. She also has to combat strange work hours to keep up her active lifestyle and exercise regimen, which is exactly why we picked her. When you’re among those who are trying to lose weight but have a hectic schedule, Rachael’s the blogger to turn to for advice. She knows how to fight obstacles like sleep deprivation, food cravings, boredom hunger and (of course) being “too busy” to get healthy.
Fennel, peppermint, and ginger have all been shown in research studies to have calming effects on the belly. They work by enhancing digestive enzymes so your food gets moved through your system faster. And faster-moving food means a flatter tummy. In addition, peppermint reduces cramping and gas, ginger helps with nausea and inflammation, and fennel is a diuretic to help you stop retaining water.
hey wow this is inspiring! im in my mid 20s and although have been slightly over weight here and there i usually stay within a BMI of 24-26. coming from a family that eats relatively healthy yet can eat what ever they want and still struggle to gain weight i am definitely the black sheep. i figured this was just my body since my parents have put me on diets since the age of 1 (doctors orders). This past February i decided to get fit for the summer after looking at a terrible photo of me on the beach and decided to count calories to see where i was going wrong. although i was eating my suggested calories a lot were bad (overdoing things with olive oil, cheese, salad dressing- all things i thought were good). so i recently decided to stick to a 80% clean plan, which is easy for me since i love my veggies. except cutting out oils and cheese made me realize i was slightly and mostly eating vegan 60-70% of the time. after losing 10 pounds i hit a plateau for a few months until i cut another 100 calories. as i am in health care i worry about enough nutrients, calcium, protein ect so i spoke to my doctor who told me to eat more! he sent me to both a dietitian and nutritionist who both told me not to worry as my BMI was now 22.8 and that calorie shouldn’t matter but i know theres something wrong. im not going to count calories for the rest of my life but i do believe it is important at beginning stages. im currently consuming 600 calories per day! i know its scary when i say it but its mostly raw veggies and im actually full but my energy level is still low so ive had to stop exercising as much. i now struggle to eat more without felling stuffed or bloated, did you have this issue too? was it hard to eat more and was it a gradual increasing of calories? and when you went from 900 to 1500+ did you gain weight initially with the added calories and then start losing or did you just start losing from where your current weight was?
The first couple of weeks of wanting to make a change were in a very busy season of life. The first two weeks of January were filled with healthy food and exercise, but as soon as classes started, the business really kicked in. There were weekly ministry activities, ultimate frisbee practice, classes, research projects, trying to hang out with friends before everyone moved across the country after graduation, etc. The busier my schedule was, the less important healthy eating and exercise became. It was only a few weeks and I fell of the bandwagon and was back to my old habits and feeling frustrated. I would tell myself “I’ll eat better tomorrow” or “I’ll work out tomorrow night” and then had such difficulty following through. I pushed it off and pushed it off.  I had some short streaks of eating well, but my lack of self-control would lead me to easily giving up. I made excuses for my unhealthy lifestyle like “I’ve always been overweight” or “I’ve never consistently worked out” because there were overweight people that loved themselves well too.
You might say Vicki’s weight loss blog is an up-and-comer. She’s using it as a platform to launch herself into meeting her 60-pound weight loss goal, and here’s the thing: she’s doing a darn good job. Reading through her blog, it will become very clear that no matter the ups-and-downs, Vicki’s commitment to losing weight and changing her life is wholesome and candid. She shares her food choices, her exercise routines, her enthusiasm and even the occasional let-down. Her blog is perfect if you’re looking to follow along with someone from the beginning - someone who will very likely get there soon.

If in doubt, start at a lower level. You can always skip ahead if you feel it is too easy or switch to a more difficult plan. The great thing is that all of the plans burn calories and all of the plans require commitment. As long as you give it your best at every workout (and watch your calorie intake!), you will make progress, will burn calories, will drop the pounds and will get stronger.

If you need inspiration, look no further! Sean is a fabulous weight-loss blogger who has lost 200 pounds! His blog follows his journey toward "improved health and fitness, one sport, goal, and day at a time." Sean's goal is to lose 225 pounds through eating healthy foods and exercise. I love his approach to weight loss. Sean writes: "It’s taken me years to put this weight on so I guess I’ve always just known it was going to take time and motivation to get it off. I also wasn’t looking for a quick fix…instead I wanted to find a permanent and intelligent way to live and be healthy while still enjoying life along the way."

Think about it: If you have a big plate, it may be easy to pile on the food until the plate is full, leaving you with portions that are way too large. "Since I regularly ate balanced meals, I knew it was my portions that had to be fixed," says Erika Cataldi. "I began using toddler plates; I could load them up and still feel like I was getting a lot." That optical illusion help Cataldi drop 70 pounds.
Roni has become a true pillar of success and innovation in the weight loss blogger community. If you ever thought of following a weight loss blog, you would be hard-pressed to miss Roni. She has been blogging since 2005, when she decided to leave behind a lifetime of diets, baggy clothes and insecurity and swap it out for celebration of a journey to reach her weight loss goals. Now Roni inspires others with her journey and runs a full-time blogging business. She’s the proud creator of BlogToLose.com, a platform that gives other bloggers a place to document their own journeys, as well as the FitBloggin’ organizer, where she brings together weight loss bloggers in a yearly conference.
“If a client has come to me looking to lose 10 pounds, I would tell them to simply move. Move more, and more often. Walk or bike ride to class or work, even park further away from your location in the parking lot. Take the stairs or take a walk during lunch. You don’t have to spend hours every day in the gym sweating, but you do have to make a conscious effort to move more, and sit less. This works great because it doesn’t feel like work and you’re burning more and more calories throughout the day.” — Ajia Cherry, personal trainer and Founder at Functional Innovative Training
It might seem kind of odd to find a “How to Start a Healthy Lifestyle Blog” page on Organize Yourself Skinny. Most of you come to my blog to learn about meal prep, meal planning, exercise, and a whole host of other healthy weight loss habits. However, the most common 2 questions I get after “How did you lose weight?” is “how do I start my own blog?” followed by “how do you make money from your blog?”. So instead of sending you all over the internet trying to point you in the right direction I decided to put together a page dedicated to helping my readers start their own blog.

In 1997, Dawn weighed 378 pounds. When she started blogging in 2007, she weighed 344 - not much healthier. In January 2010, Dawn had lost it all and finally found herself in maintenance mode with a weight of 178. And she’s done very, very well at keeping the weight off for the last few years. How? By sharing her ambitions and wayfaring with her many members and page viewers, of course! One impressive thing about Dawn, weight loss never seems out of reach when she sets her mind to it. Dawn is great at switching things up, doing different exercises, eating different foods and even joining in on gym and online contests to see who can lose the most weight.

As a registered dietitian who counsels private clients (and who has experienced my own weight-loss journey), I understand that desire. But unlike gradual weight loss, rapid weight loss can be dangerous and ultimately counterproductive when it comes to shedding unwanted fat. But how? What’s the difference between losing 15 pounds in two weeks versus two months? A lot.
Do it better: The best way to know if you're eating too much is to write it down. "Even if you note it on a napkin and then throw it away, that's okay. Just the act of writing makes you more aware," says Taub-Dix. Portion control cues help too: A baseball-size serving for chopped veggies and fruits; a golf ball for nuts and shredded cheese; a fist for rice and pasta; and a deck of cards for lean meats.
The best way to lower your cortisol levels is by decreasing stress. While it’s easier said than done, weight loss tips like this one involve you simply taking the time to put yourself and your health first. Practicing saying “no” to events and things you know will cause you stress, carve out time to exercise, set aside some time daily — even just 5 minutes — to meditate or practice gratitude and learn to recognize when you’re feeling extra worn out and need a time out.
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