Roni has become a true pillar of success and innovation in the weight loss blogger community. If you ever thought of following a weight loss blog, you would be hard-pressed to miss Roni. She has been blogging since 2005, when she decided to leave behind a lifetime of diets, baggy clothes and insecurity and swap it out for celebration of a journey to reach her weight loss goals. Now Roni inspires others with her journey and runs a full-time blogging business. She’s the proud creator of BlogToLose.com, a platform that gives other bloggers a place to document their own journeys, as well as the FitBloggin’ organizer, where she brings together weight loss bloggers in a yearly conference.
When Sarah’s son turned 5, she decided it was finally time to give up a lifetime of bad habits and replace them with not only better food choices, but a passion for running she didn’t know she had. Sarah started to pound the pavement, and found that not only did she lose 70 pounds, but she gained so much joy out of life. Now, Sarah’s mission is clear: to keep the weight off, share her passion for running (as well as her many impressive races, from 5Ks to half-marathons, even a 200-mile relay race) and bring everyone along with her as she inspires the online community to live a healthy life, and live it to the fullest.
About: Gina has the kind of success story that really touches a nerve. She started out at 298 pounds and went on to lose 168 of those pounds in 25 months. As someone who always struggled with her weight and achieved such a huge thing, she has an especially good grasp on how to help other people who have 100 or more pounds to lose achieve their goals. Her blog is a place she uses to motivate, inspire, energize and connect with others. And that’s exactly what it is.
After a cancer diagnosis sent her normally healthy lifestyle off-course, flight attendant Tracey Z. Dickson was heavier than she had ever been. When she was declared cancer-free, she hopped back on the treadmill and got her diet in order—and went from 158 pounds to 117. One of her diet secrets? "Instead of dessert, I'll have a baked sweet potato sprinkled with cinnamon," she says. "It tastes like I'm eating sweet potato pie, but for a ton less calories." For more healthy ideas on how to get your sugar fix, check out these desserts with 150 calories (or less).

On my weight loss and fitness blog I don’t have any links of my own to anything, there are too many links out there promising you things that are just not true and don’t belong in a realistic world. I started my blog as my lady has had a problem all of her life, so I though she can’t be the only one so I started to blog about it. I do have ad-sense on my site, I believe a bit of income for our hard work is OK.


While it will help, it’s not going to eliminate your sleep deprivation. That apart, doing this will throw off your natural sleep-wake cycle so it could end up doing more harm than good. Not only can the right food aid sleep, it works the other way too — better sleep promotes weight loss. Lack of sleep, however, has been found to stimulate production of hunger hormone ghrelin, which makes us overeat.
Glad you started to work out! It took me to my mid 30’s before I started to workout! Now I do it at least 5 times a week! You feel so much better about yourself and your doing something good!! I’m glad you have a family that supports your healthy eating! Sometimes it can be hard when they don’t!!! Keep up all the great work and keep educating yourself on a healthy lifestyle!
The trick here is not only to avoid all obvious sources of carbohydrate (sweets, bread, spaghetti, rice, potatoes), but also to be careful with your protein intake. If you eat large amounts of meat, eggs and the like, the excess protein will be converted into glucose in your body. Large amounts of protein can also raise your insulin levels somewhat. This compromises optimal ketosis.
Because men are larger than women on average and have more muscle to support, men can usually eat more calories while still losing weight, compared to women. Portion control may be especially important for women. In one study, women who ate smaller portions of food (and less food overall) had lower BMIs than women who limited or avoided a certain type of food.2 This approach seems to work better for women than men.3
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