In 1997, Dawn weighed 378 pounds. When she started blogging in 2007, she weighed 344 - not much healthier. In January 2010, Dawn had lost it all and finally found herself in maintenance mode with a weight of 178. And she’s done very, very well at keeping the weight off for the last few years. How? By sharing her ambitions and wayfaring with her many members and page viewers, of course! One impressive thing about Dawn, weight loss never seems out of reach when she sets her mind to it. Dawn is great at switching things up, doing different exercises, eating different foods and even joining in on gym and online contests to see who can lose the most weight.
Both protocols of rapid WL and slow WL caused reduction in waist circumference, hip circumference, total body water, body fat mass, lean body mass, and resting metabolic rate (RMR). Further reduction in waist circumference, hip circumference, fat mass, and percentage of body fat was observed in slow WL and decreased total body water, lean body mass, fat free mass, and RMR was observed in rapid WL. Improvement in lipid and glycemic profiles was observed in both groups. Reduction of low-density lipoprotein and fasting blood sugar, improvement of insulin resistance, and sensitivity were more significant in rapid WL in comparison to slow WL.
Hi! I am 18 years old. My weight is 50 kilos. I really want to lose weight. I have a very nig tummy. But I don’t know hot to start this dieg since I’m really a rice eater. Rice is our main dish. I tried not eating rice before but I felt like I’m going to faint. I don’t have energy and I’m always hungry. I think my body is really used to have rice. Is it still possible to lose weight if there’s rice on my meal? Please help me. Hope to hear from you soon. Cheers!

A year ago you couldn't find a fitter man than Drew of Fit2Fat2Fit, but then the personal trainer decided to take on a new project in order to better understand what his overweight clients were going through. He gained 70 pounds over six months—going from "fit to fat"—and is now in the process of going from "fat to fit." Along the way he's learned a lot about the mental struggles of weight loss, as well as the physical: check out his post about feeling too self-conscious to dance with his wife.
●Halt bad eating habits. Before you cave to the crave, hit the pause button, recommends Pamela Peeke, author of the bestseller “The Hunger Fix: The Three Stage Detox and Recovery Plan for Overeating and Food Addiction.” Ask yourself: “Am I hungry? Angry? Anxious? Lonely? Tired?” Get in touch with your emotions and ask, “Am I’m emotional right now? Am I about to knee-jerk into overeating?”
Of course, for any of these income streams to actually make money you need blog traffic. Don’t expect to bring in thousands of dollars every month if you’re only getting 1 – 5k pageviews a month. You need people coming to your blog in order for you to make any money. More importantly you need to build a blog community that your readers believe in and trust.
Personally, I find the cheat day important because it gives you something to look forward to. This diet is a huge change from most Westerners’ lifestyles. With the diet comes a lot of cravings, especially in the beginning. I would make a little note of anything that I was craving and made sure I went out and bought it Saturday morning. For example, this is what my first cheat day looked like:
“Weight-bearing exercises help with building and maintaining muscle mass, as well as building bone strength and decreasing your risk for osteoporosis,” says David. “Many people over [the age of] 50 will stop exercising regularly, due to pain in their joints or back or injury, but don’t give up! Find a professional that can help get you back on track, and aim to get at least 150 minutes of physical activity [in] a week to help maintain your muscle mass and a healthy weight.”

So what can we do with all this knowledge? Tempting as it is to get discouraged, we can actually find it encouraging. Biology is not destiny, after all. “Lifestyle choices are immensely powerful,” Peeke says. And on the heels of any tidal wave of new research is sure to come a trickle of weight-loss advice that can be more customized and more effective to help men and women with their weight-loss obstacles, no matter what they are.
Klein, S., Burke, L.E., Bray, G.A., Blair, S., Allison, D.B., Pi-Sunyer, X., et al. (2004). Clinical Implications of Obesity With Specific Focus on Cardiovascular Disease: A Statement for Professionals From the American Heart Association Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism: Endorsed by the American College of Cardiology Foundation. Circulation; 110(18): 2952-2967.
×