Like I said, all of this revamped progress started in August and the weight loss was slow. Slow like an average of 1 pound a week. Some weeks I would lose 1 or 2 pounds and other weeks I would lose nothing. For a while, I didn't notice any physical changes and if it wasn't for the fact that I was standing on a scale looking at a different number, I wouldn't have any guessed my body was changing. The biggest change for me during this time was not what my body looked like, but what it felt like. I noticed the food I ate (in combination with my work outs) left me with more energy. I felt less sluggish and more ready to take on the day. Completed workouts and nutritious choices filled me with confidence and empowerment.
the perfect post for me to read today as I try to get back on track starting this week. I have a goal in mind but I’m not good with strict,regimented routines. I do better with smart/sensible/common sense choices – ie dont eat processed foods, portion control, stay away from fried/sugary foods etc. So glad I read this post, perfect motivation for a monday morning!
Watching that extra junk around your trunk turn your body into a full-blown Buddha belly puts you at an increased risk for heart disease, diabetes, and early death. Luckily, losing the weight doesn’t have to take forever; with these 22 belly fat-fighting tips, you can shave two inches off your waistline in as little as two weeks. Think your age will stand in the way of your weight loss? The 20 Ways to Lose Your Belly When You’re Older will help folks of any age get on track to their best body ever.

Very informative. I’m just now starting out on my weight loss journey, and have started a weight loss blog of my own. My entire family are overweight and it is a struggle dealing with them as I try to change my habits. Even harder because being around them in an environment where eating bad is easy to get away with makes me fall back. I am finding each time I go back home I end up binging.
No significant changes were observed in systolic and diastolic blood pressure in any of these 2 diets, although a non-significant reduction in average blood pressure at the end of the study was observed in both groups. It seems that the effects of weight-loss diets on the decrease of blood pressure was more concrete in people with hypertension (27). Consistent with the current study, several studies did not support the impact of WL on blood pressure in people, who had normal blood pressure (16, 28).
Hi mi 16 years old and I’m scared to get on the scale to weigh myself because the last time I was 222lbs and that’s horrible I know that. I cry a lot because I just can’t seem to lose weight and I get called names based on my weight a lot. I’m really a girly girl and I hate going shopping now because of my weight. I really want to lose my stomach fat, lose thighs, arms,back, and everything else or at least tighten it up because I’m going to be a senior next year. And I doubt I’ll get asked to the prom If I look the way I look. So that’s my goal for the summer. I’ve been looking online for a while to find ways to lose weight I even considered pills and when I get like that (desperate) I even think about just ending all my problems permanently if you know what I mean.
Glad you started to work out! It took me to my mid 30’s before I started to workout! Now I do it at least 5 times a week! You feel so much better about yourself and your doing something good!! I’m glad you have a family that supports your healthy eating! Sometimes it can be hard when they don’t!!! Keep up all the great work and keep educating yourself on a healthy lifestyle!
Tina is not only stunningly beautiful (as you’re sure to notice when you look at her photos), but smart, full of a love of life and fitness, and inspirational as well. At 5 feet 4 inches tall, Tina had let her weight creep up on her after graduating college. Through changing her eating habits and finding an impressive love of crossfit and other exercise regimes, Tina reached her goal weight of 130 pounds in 2006 and has been sharing her story with others ever since. Her blog has it all - personal adventures and musings, reviews, recipes, weight loss and fitness tips, even a list of her favorite shopping products. Perhaps that’s why her blog has gained such popularity, with millions of pageviews and thousands of subscribers, “Carrots ‘N’ Cake” is one you won’t want to scan over.
One of the most striking things about Grace’s story is that she overcame more than just obesity (an extremely difficult thing to overcome in and of itself). After years of hating herself, Grace turned to addiction to cope with her low self-image. She abused alcohol, drugs and food for years - and it wasn’t until drinking herself into a stupor and waking up extremely sick the next morning that Grace realized it was time to make a change. Over the next few years, she started exercising and eating right, overcame her addictions, and lost over 80 pounds. Now, Grace uses her blog as a platform to stay consistent. She is honest about her struggles and recognizes that she can’t be perfect, but doesn’t let that stop her from trying to maintain a healthier lifestyle every day.
Of carbs and protein, that is. Carbs certainly aren’t the enemy; you can totally enjoy carbs and still lose weight. The trick is to choose something complex (like brown rice, quinoa, or whole grain bread) or something refined (like white rice, white pasta, and white bread), and pair it with a protein. So if you’re having crackers for a snack, make sure you also eat some almonds or a stick of string cheese. “I always incorporate a protein and carbohydrate at every meal,” Jim White, RD, ACSM Health, and owner of Jim White Fitness & Nutrition Studios told us. “It can curb your appetite and it slows down the glycemic index of some of your higher sugar foods.”
About: My Fat Friend Blog mixes two total opposites: Alex, the “fat friend” who is trying to lose weight and get fit. Sarah is the “not-fat friend,” the one who is really into fitness and healthy eating and who is on a mission to help Alex learn to love it the way she does. The blog is very, very new (just started in March), but so far, so good. The posts are entertaining, have fun photos and will have you laughing out loud.
Emily’s bubbly, vivacious personality comes through in her writing every single time she posts. As someone who suffered from Binge Eating Disorder, Emily had spent a lifetime hating herself for overeating and constantly battling the number on the scale. So, she decided to do something about it. She started her blog to deal with her emotional eating, learn to love herself and lay it all out there for the world to follow along. And follow along they did. Emily has thousands of followers, and with the healthy mix of vulnerability and sprightly character her writing displays, she is certain to gain many, many more.
When you open up “My Bizzy Kitchen” and start to read, you will laugh. Not just chuckle a little, but actually laugh out loud. Beth’s writing clearly reflects the positive stance she takes on life. In fact, it’s almost as if she was never diagnosed with Type II Diabetes and never had to overcome weight issues. But she does, and her blog proves it. With a pension for silliness tapered with some very emotional posts about her day-to-day struggles, her life and more, you will find yourself returning to Beth’s blog again and again.
About: Jade’s 6+ years of experience blogging means, at first glance, we would have passed right over her for this list. But it’s her recent debut into weight loss and healthy living blogging that caught our eye. Jade lives in Singapore, and just looking at Jade’s photos, it’s hard to imagine her as ever being overweight. But in 2012, she was unhappy with the way she looked, a feeling she’d had her whole life. Then the thought occurred to her that she had the power to change it. A total lifestyle overhaul and 44 pounds later, and Jade’s story is a success we can all admire.
I can’t tell you how many women come up to me and coyly ask “what about loose extra skin after weight loss?” and my answer is always “exercise babe!” Exercise will tone up your body and give you that lean look you want. If you are exercising while you lose weight it is even better, you will be tightening and toning as you’re losing the weight. But for those of you who have already lost the weight you can still get that toned body you want, and you will get it with exercise, babe!
About: Gina has the kind of success story that really touches a nerve. She started out at 298 pounds and went on to lose 168 of those pounds in 25 months. As someone who always struggled with her weight and achieved such a huge thing, she has an especially good grasp on how to help other people who have 100 or more pounds to lose achieve their goals. Her blog is a place she uses to motivate, inspire, energize and connect with others. And that’s exactly what it is.
Sheryl’s story is a touching one. After spending 21 years in an abusive relationship and battling obesity her whole life, Sheryl decided it was time for a change. She started her blog back in April of 2012 at a weight of just over 300 pounds, and gave herself a deadline of 500 days to get her body (and emotions) to a place where she’s not only comfortable - but confident as well. A year later, she’s down almost 50 pounds - quite the feat when you consider that she suffers from many health issues - including chronic headaches and severe back and knee problems. Sheryl is still fighting every day to get where she wants to be, and she is sure to trust readers by putting herself out there in a completely honest and open fashion.
I saw a post on pinterest for your pumpkin spice drink and started clicking around! Congratulations on your weight loss! I have just started working out regularly for the first time (just about) in my whole life. But what I’ve been learning slowly, even before I began the physical regimen, is how important it is to eat real food. Thanks to people around me who love food and their families health enough to really get informed about it, I’ve been seeing just how misinformed we are and how duped we can be by clever marketing that claims to be “healthy”. When I learned where skim milk comes from and how it’s made (and, for instance that it’s used to fatten pigs up) and that real dairy fats (in moderation) are linked to weight loss but “fat-free” items quite the opposite, I was stunned! Then I thought, of course! People were eating the real things long before heart disease and obesity ravaged our culture. When you start to learn about real nutrition instead of what we’ve been sold by industries, it can be a really great weight loss tool. And, I have to say thank you for using things like coconut milk in some of your recipes! I have a dairy intolerance and it’s nice to know that for the pumpkin spice recipe, at least, I wouldn’t have to tweak it myself!!! I look forward to reading more and trying some of your creations!
Plain and simple: We just don't feel full by liquid calories in quite the same way as we do real food. Drinking a juice or caramel coffee drink, for instance, won't make you feel full the way eating a bowl of veggie- and protein-packed stir-fry will. So monitor your intake of juice, soda, sweetened coffee and tea, and alcoholic beverages. If you consume each of those beverages during the day, you'll have taken in at least 800 extra calories by nighttime — and you'll still be hungry. (Incidentally, alcohol may suppress the metabolism of fat, making it tougher for you to burn those calories.) Some other ways to skip sugar? Check 'em out here.
Katie’s weight has been a challenge her entire life. But after having two boys, she reached an all-time high: 253 pounds. That was when she decided to make a change, but it didn’t happen right away. For the next three years, she dieted and bounced between losing and gaining 50 pounds. Her real weight loss journey began in 2009, when she used calorie counting and running to take off 125 pounds. Today, she writes about maintaining that loss, running, being a mother, and managing a bipolar diagnosis. Visit the blog.
It can be harder to lose weight after menopause. In fact, many women gain an average of 5 pounds after menopause.5 Lower estrogen levels may play a role in weight gain after menopause. But weight gain may be caused by your metabolism slowing down as you age, less-healthful eating habits, and being less active. You also lose muscle mass as you age, so you use fewer calories.
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